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The Blowout of all Blowouts


Wildon NFL Football

NFL Football

This post may not have a lot to do with disabilities, unless you consider the inability of a football team that was favored to win the Super Bowl. I watched the game, the entire game, which is something I have not done in years. I was actually favoring the Denver Broncos based on what I had heard and seen on various media.

Earlier in the afternoon, I watched a game in my favorite sport, hockey, between the Winnipeg Jets and the Montreal Canadiens. The Winnipeg Jets ended up winning that game and somewhat got me ready to watch the football game of the year. The first quarter of the game made it impossible to not watch the rest of it. It was much like trying to turn your head away from a train wreck, it just can’t be done. Denver was just unable to get past the Seattle defensive unit and made mistakes that allowed the Seahawks to capitalize on. No doubt there was lots of talk in the Denver locker room during after the first half about doing more to get the job done. The players come onto the field after half time and then what happens; Seattle returns the kick to open the half from Denver all the way to score a touchdown.

I was really expecting more for a Super Bowl game. In any case, the game is in the books and quite possibly will be remembered for some time as the blow out of blow outs. I doubt that anyone, even the experts, could have expected an outcome like this. The final score ended up being 43 – 8 in favor of the Seattle Seahawks. For more information on the game, check out this website. What do others think about the football game from this year’s Super Bowl? I’d like to hear from everyone about the game.

Cheers,

GP Joa

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Bell Let’s Talk Day


Man on bench with head lowered

Man on bench with head lowered

Depression is an illness that is stigmatized considerably. It is a disease that often goes undetected and affects as many as 3 million Canadians at this time. It is estimated that one in five Canadians will be affected with some form of mental illness in their lifetime. If you think about it, you will probably come to know of sometime in your lifetime that you may have been affected with depression or dementia or some other mental illness or know someone who has been affected.

Mental illness is a disability that often goes undetected and is not something others can often see if you are affected. Many affected with mental illness are often too ashamed to make their feelings known to others and as such often suffer in silence. Sufferers can endure this illness for varying lengths of time and for some this can last a lifetime requiring regular treatment. There are a number of ways for those affected to get help and making the issue known to others is often the first step to getting such help. Those affected often do not understand why they are feeling the way they do and making their feelings known can go a long way into having a diagnoses made and the necessary treatments put into place.

You can help make a difference today, January 28, 2014 by sending a text message or using social media to make your voice heard. For more information on how you can help raise money for mental illness addiction, visit the Bell Let’s Talk Day website to learn more.

Regards,

GP Joa

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The Interview


Man on the phone who is holding his head in his hand and stressed

Stressed Out Man

Everything was going well; the questions were easily answered and we seemed to have somewhat of a rapport going. But I had been through this many times before and knew at some point it was coming. I really hoped that this time that may not be the case, but I had hoped that before. My documentation was great and my experience and references had to work in my favor, but again, I thought the same things before.

Things just are not like they used to be. There was a time when there was no Internet and certain questions rarely ever came up. Having experience and good references were generally all it took to make a lasting impression and get you through the door. But the new millennium has been here for several years now and things have changed considerably. But with advancements in just about everything, it stands to reason that methodologies had to change and people needed to take steps necessary to protect the interests of themselves and others.

Then it happened, the question I had been dreading, “Do you have any medical issues that could cause you problems if you were to be selected for this position?” Here we go again. How should I answer? If I don’t tell the truth, I could jeopardize myself down the road as employers have legal recourse should you not be truthful during the interview process. However, if I tell the truth, my chances of getting this job, which I really need, are for the most part over. It’s a double edged sword, damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

Despite having a great resume and excellent references, having any type of disability or medical condition makes obtaining employment that much more difficult. There are many people who appear just fine when you see them, but they could have a condition that is not obviously apparent and one that may cause them to miss work from time to time or make it that much more difficult for them to perform basic duties that may be required of them. After all, lost time costs employers significant amounts of money overall every year. These same employers have every right to look at the bottom line and ensure their profits are not eaten away by additional costs.

Unfortunately, for many who have a disability, the inability to secure employment due to their disability is a common occurrence. I know this first hand as it is myself who had these concerns when going through job interviews, and then only to be turned away because of my sharing about my issues of chronic pain due to spinal stenosis as well as having to take medications on a daily basis to be able to function somewhat normally. There are others who suffer from other such ailments such as depression, fibromyalgia, MS, and others who have similar problems obtaining decent employment, if any at all.

I can’t blame companies for their denial to employ such people, after all, they need people who are going to show up to work everyday as well as being able to help keep their employer’s costs low. Having a portion of your workforce driving your insurance premiums up who may or may not be at work tomorrow can cause some stresses on smaller businesses. Larger companies also seem to be hesitant to hire people with disabilities, especially those that are more prone to missing work due to their illnesses or disabilities.

Has anyone experienced such rejection when applying for employment? We would really like to hear from you and get your opinion on this particular topic. Hope to hear from you soon.

Regards,

GP Joa

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Welcome Back


It’s been several months since I have written anything on this site. Things moved quite fast for a few months with a great deal of activity which made it difficult to keep up with the daily requirements of running websites.

I’ve decided to make some changes with the website and discuss a subject that hits home with myself and with others that I know of. There are many out there who suffer everyday in silence who on the outside look perfectly normal as well as those who may not. But if we were to look closer, we would find these people suffer from issues that prevent them from living normal lives. Some live with depression or mental disabilities, or with a disease that does not present itself visually, or perhaps it does. There are also those who have to live daily with pain that prevents them from carrying out normal tasks or those who suffer from addictions due to medications they have been forced to take to just be able to cope from day to day.

Disabilities, either visible or non-visible, are often misunderstood by most people or they do not know how to deal with someone who may have a disability. This website is intended to help those with disabilities as well as those who do not. I hope to make disabilities better understood by all and provide information that will help everyone better cope with issues that may arise concerning a disability, whether visible or non-visible.

Of course, there will be those topics that come to my attention through various forms of media that will grab my attention making me feel compelled to comment on. In such instances I will certainly take the time to provide my point of view on the topic and I hope people will provide comments with their point of view on such posts.

Please feel free to comment and suggest issues you would like to see discussed or that will be of interest to others.

Regards,

GP Joa

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